Video FAQ – What Can Stop Severe Snoring?

Click to View More Videos

What Can Be Done About Severe Snoring?

Do you have, or sleep with someone who has, a severe snoring problem? If you or your sleep partner is not getting enough sleep due to severe snoring, Dr. Ronald Popper has a few suggestions that may help. Severe snoring can prevent you or your partner from getting enough rest, but could also indicate a more serious underlying sleep disorder. This video series on obstructive sleep apnea and other sleep disorders, as well as chronic severe snoring, was produced by Dr. Popper to address your general questions about sleep and sleep disorders. If you have specific questions about your personal condition, please contact Dr. Popper using the information below. Subscribe to our YouTube channel to be alerted when a new FAQ video is posted. If you need information right away, please Contact us here on this site or on our Facebook page. We'll get back to you as quickly as possible.

The Question – What Can Be Done to Stop Severe Snoring?

“Many treatments are available for snoring and what is most effective depends on the severity and cause of your snoring. Sometimes, simply losing weight or treating nasal allergies is effective. Surgery for the upper airway can be very effective as can appliances that are placed in the mouth and worn during sleep.

Breath Right nasal strips are bandage-like devices worn on the outside of the nose that spread the nostrils and can reduce or eliminate snoring. A newer device called Theravent is also a bandage-like device but goes a step further by including small valves that produce positive airway pressure inside the nose and keep the airway open.

Learn More

Video FAQ – Is Napping a Good Thing?

Click to View More Videos

Is Napping a Good Thing or a Bad Thing?

Is napping a good thing or a bad thing? Dr. Ronald Popper discusses napping and explains that it all depends on the reasons for your napping. Frequent napping may mean that you're not getting enough rest, and could signify an underlying sleep disorder. This video FAQ series on obstructive sleep apnea and other sleep disorders, as well as chronic severe snoring, was created and produced by Dr. Popper to address your general questions about sleep and sleep disorders. If you have specific questions about your personal condition, please contact Dr. Popper using the information below. Subscribe to our YouTube channel to be alerted when a new FAQ video is posted. If you need information right away, please Contact us here on this site or on our Facebook page. We'll get back to you as quickly as possible.

The Question – Is Napping a Good Thing or a Bad Thing?

“It all depends on why you're napping. If you're napping because you're feeling tired or sleepy at a time when you should be alert, the need to nap may indicate that you have a sleep disorder, that you're not getting enough rest, or are having poor quality of sleep.

Sometimes taking a brief power nap of 10 to 20 minutes can help energize you for the rest of the day. But if you're frequently requiring a nap because you're feeling sluggish in the middle of your day, consider consulting with your physician.

Learn More

Video FAQ – Does Alcohol Affect Sleep?

Click to View More Videos

How Does Alcohol Affect Sleep Patterns?

How does alcohol affect sleep patterns? Dr. Ronald Popper explains what effects alcohol can have on your sleep patterns and how those effects can disrupt a good night's rest. This video FAQ series on obstructive sleep apnea and other sleep disorders, as well as chronic severe snoring, was created and produced by Dr. Popper to address your general questions about sleep and sleep disorders. If you have specific questions about your personal condition, please contact Dr. Popper using the information below. Subscribe to our YouTube channel to be alerted when a new FAQ video is posted. If you need information right away, please Contact us here on this site or on our Facebook page. We'll get back to you as quickly as possible.

The Question – How Does Alcohol Affect Sleep Patterns?

“Alcohol acts like a sedative. It will make you sleepy and you will fall asleep more quickly. You'll have a deeper sleep during the first part of the night.

However as the alcohol is metabolized and leaves your body during the second half of the night you will experience more sleep disruption and a poorer quality of sleep. You may also suffer from REM sleep rebound which results in increased dreaming and possibly nightmares.

As a result, you will awaken feeling fatigued and dissatisfied with your sleep.

Learn More

Video FAQ – Getting Enough Rest

Click to View More Videos

How Can I Tell If I'm Not Getting Enough Rest?

How can I tell if I'm not getting enough rest? Dr. Ronald Popper discusses how to determine whether you simply have an occasional poor night's sleep, or if some underlying condition may be causing sleep disturbances on a regular basis. Dr. Popper produced this video FAQ series on obstructive sleep apnea and other sleep disorders, as well as chronic severe snoring, to address your general questions about sleep and sleep disorders. If you have specific questions about your personal condition, please contact Dr. Popper using the information below. Subscribe to our YouTube channel to be alerted when a new FAQ video is posted. If you need information right away, please Contact us here on this site or on our Facebook page. We'll get back to you as quickly as possible.

The Question – How Can I Tell If I'm Not Getting Enough Rest?

“Everyone has a bad night's sleep from time to time, but if you believe you are consistently not getting enough rest, try to assess the way you feel after your normal amount of sleep.

Do you find yourself yawning or nodding off when you should be alert? Do you have to drink coffee or other caffeinated products to maintain your level of alertness? Do you find it hard to stay awake while driving, reading, or watching TV?

If your answer is “yes” to any of these questions, then you may not be getting enough sleep, or experiencing some type of sleep disturbance on a regular basis.

Learn More

Video FAQ – How Much Sleep is Enough?

Click to View More Videos

How Much Sleep Do I Really Need?

How much sleep do I really need? A question asked by many people, particularly those who feel they may not be getting enough rest in their normal night's sleep. Dr. Ronald Popper produced this video FAQ series on obstructive sleep apnea and other sleep disorders, as well as chronic severe snoring, to address your general questions about sleep and sleep disorders. In this video, Dr. Popper discusses how much sleep most people need under normal circumstances. If you have specific questions about your personal condition, please contact Dr. Popper using the information below. Subscribe to our YouTube channel to be alerted when a new FAQ video is posted. If you need information right away, please Contact us here on this site or on our Facebook page. We'll get back to you as quickly as possible.

The Question – How Much Sleep Do I Really Need?

“Several studies have shown the range of normal sleep varies by age. Typically, a newborn, up to about three months old, will require 14 to 17 hours of sleep daily, while infants will sleep for 12 to 15 hours a day. Toddlers, age 1 or 2 years, require slightly less sleep, about 11 to 14 hours daily while preschoolers up to age five need 10 to 13 hours a day.

Young children up to age 13 will require 9 to 11 hours, while teenagers sleep for 8 to 10 hours daily. From about the age of 25 up to age 64, most adults will sleep for 7 to 9 hours. while older adults over the age of 65 require 8 hours of sleep per night.

Learn More

1 2 3 13