Video FAQ – Why Use Humidification with CPAP?

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Humidification as Part of Your CPAP Treatment

CPAP therapy has long been the gold standard for the treatment of obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. In this latest video in our series on sleep disorders, we discuss the importance of including humidification in your CPAP therapy for the best possible results. This video series has been produced to answer your questions about sleep apnea and other sleep disorders. If you have a question that is not addressed in these videos, please subscribe to our YouTube channel to be alerted when a new FAQ video is posted. If you need information quickly, feel free to Contact us here on the site or on our Facebook page. We'll get back to you as quickly as possible.

Why is humidification advised with the use of nasal CPAP?

In my patients, I always advise that they use a humidifier along with nasal CPAP. The nose is your body's natural humidifier. With nasal CPAP, air is blown into the upper airway at a very high flow rate which makes it impossible for your nose to adequately humidify your air. The air then dries out the lining of the nose. The nose lining consists of millions of hair-like structures which are constantly beating and brushing away bacteria and dirt and dust from the upper airway.

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Video FAQ – What is An Oral Appliance?

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Oral Appliances for Snoring Relief and Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome

In this installment of our video FAQ series on sleep disorders, we discuss oral appliances to stop snoring and to reduce obstructive sleep apnea symptoms. This series has been created to address your questions about sleep apnea and other sleep disorders. If your question has not been answered, please subscribe to our YouTube channel to be alerted when a new FAQ video is posted. If you need information quickly, feel free to Contact us here on the site or on our Facebook page. We'll get back to you as quickly as possible.

How Does An Oral Appliance Help You Stop Snoring?

In this video I display an example of an oral appliance. As you will see, there are two denture-like devices; a lower denture, and an upper denture. On the lower denture is a little wing-like device. And on the upper denture is a screw-like device. This works by advancing the screws against the wing, causing the lower denture to move forward and thus bringing the tongue away from the back wall of the throat relieving the upper airway obstruction.

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Video FAQ – What is Provent Therapy?

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Provent Therapy for OSA and Chronic Snoring

We continue our informative video FAQ series with number eight, in which we discuss Provent Therapy for obstructive sleep apnea and snoring relief. This video series is intended to address your questions about sleep apnea and other sleep disorders. If your question has not been answered, please subscribe to our YouTube channel to be alerted when a new FAQ video is posted. If you need information quickly, feel free to contact us here on the site or on our Facebook Page. We'll get back to you as quickly as possible.

What is Provent Therapy and How Does It Relieve Snoring and OSA?

Provent is a relatively new treatment option for the treatment of severe chronic snoring and obstructive sleep apnea syndrome. Provent consists of two valves that are inserted into the nostrils and held in place by a non-allergic adhesive bandage. If one looks closely, you can see a mesh-like valve with a little hole in each side. Provent works by being open during inhalation through the nose so there is no resistance to airflow. When one exhales through the nose, the valves close and you're exhaling through those tiny holes.

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Video FAQ – What Are the Symptoms of Sleep Apnea?

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Common Signs and Symptoms of Sleep Apnea?

In video number seven of this series by Dr. Popper he outlines the most common signs and symptoms of obstructive sleep apnea as well as some more serious issues that have been associated with this condition. This series has been designed to address your questions about sleep apnea and other sleep disorders. If your question is yet to be answered, please subscribe to our YouTube channel to be alerted when a new FAQ video is posted. If you need information quickly, feel free to contact us here on the site or on our Facebook Page. We'll get back to you as quickly as possible.

What are the most common signs and symptoms of
Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome?

The most common symptoms presented are restless non-refreshing sleep, daytime sleepiness or excessive fatigue, waking with a headache that dissipates as the day goes on, and high blood pressure. But, in addition to these symptoms, heart attack, stroke, congestive heart failure, cardiac rhythm disturbances such as atrial fibrillation, diabetes, certain cancers, and sudden death have all been associated with untreated sleep apnea.

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Video FAQ – What Is a Home Sleep Test?

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Home Testing for OSA and How It Works

In video number six of this series, Dr. Popper discusses home testing devices for obstructive sleep apnea and how they work. This video series is designed to answer your questions regarding sleep apnea and other sleep disorders. If don't find an answer to your question here, please come back soon as we're always adding new videos. You can also subscribe to our YouTube channel to be alerted when a new FAQ video is posted. If you need information quickly, feel free to contact us here on the site or on our Facebook Page. We'll get back to you as quickly as possible.

What Is a Home Sleep Test and How Does It Work?

A home sleep test is a portable device that can be used to diagnose obstructive sleep apnea syndrome in an appropriate patient in the comfort of their own home. This device usually measures four parameters of sleep; respiratory effort, by attaching a belt across the chest and the abdomen to demonstrate efforts to breath; there's usually a cannula-type device that has probes inside the nostrils and above the lip to measure airflow or air pressure; and a pulse oximeter, which is a clip that fits over the fingernail bed and measures both oxygen and heart rate.

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